Dayton Schools at Little Goose Dam

Story and Photos by Ranger Alex Miller On Sept. 22, 2017, Kahlotus High School came for a two hour visit of the Juvenille Fish Facility, powerhouse and navigation lock while on October 31 students from Washtucna High School were treated […]

Story and Photos by Ranger Alex Miller

On Sept. 22, 2017, Kahlotus High School came for a two hour visit of the Juvenille Fish Facility, powerhouse and navigation lock while on October 31 students from Washtucna High School were treated to an extended tour of the Lyon’s Ferry Fish Hatchery, Goose’s JFF, Powerhouse navigation lock and the first floor of the dam.

Students take notes as a tug prepares to push four loaded grain barges (approximately 800,000 bushels of red wheat) downriver after the navigation lock drained 46 million gallons of water and dropped 100 feet in less than 10 minutes.

Students take notes as a tug prepares to push four loaded grain barges (approximately 800,000 bushels of red wheat) downriver after the navigation lock drained 46 million gallons of water and dropped 100 feet in less than 10 minutes.

Each school brought grades 7-12, their student numbers at 22 for the entire schools. In both cases most of the teachers came along as well. The Kahlotus tour was sidetracked by the unexpected and pleasant surprise of a fish barge using the navigation lock.

Students were able to watch as 46 million gallons of water drained from the lock, dropping 100 feet in less than 10 minutes. Once completed they headed to the JFF, where the students were able to discuss the juvenile fish facility, juvenile bypass system, and USACE fish transportation program with JFF biologists Rick Weis and Scott St. John, as well as biologists from Oregon Fish and Game and Anchor QEA.

Students were able to get hands on experience with shad, juvenile salmon, lamprey macrophthalmia and invasive Siberian prawns. After an hour exploring and learning in the wet lab, the group headed into the powerhouse to discuss the six turbine generators, two of which were operating. Next the group climbed to the top of the dam to look at the transformers and to learn more about how power is distributed. One of the fortunate aspects of Little Goose’s design, is that the navigation lock, fish ladder and fish flume are all on the south side of the dam. This makes for a comprehensive visual of the many mechanisms working together at the dam.

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